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Nicole Bluin December 28, 2011 TWEET COMMENTS 0

Treasure Hunt

Grab a GPS and go geocaching

Annie Love, 29, runs briskly along her favorite loop trail around Seattle's Green Lake then suddenly veers off ...

Photo by Chris Hunter

Annie Love, 29, runs briskly along her favorite loop trail around Seattle's Green Lake then suddenly veers off in the direction the global positioning system (GPS) in her hand is indicating. She's hot on the trail of GC180ZE, a "geocache" hidden somewhere in Woodland Park and one of almost 6000 in the city. Love heads south until she reaches an upright dead tree. Bingo! She digs through a pile of leaves to find a small box, signs the tiny log book inside, replaces the container and runs off in search of the next hidden treasure.

"I've discovered some of my favorite urban trails through geocaching," says Love.

A high-tech version of hide and seek, geocaching involves logging onto one of the sport's websites, such as www.geocaching.com, and searching by zip code or region the location of local caches hidden by other "geocachers" (anyone who joins the online community and searches for or hides geocaches, or "caches" for short). Select a single or string of caches along a trail or scattered throughout a park and download their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude) to your handheld GPS receiver. Then lace up your running shoes and follow the receiver's directions to those locations to uncover the hidden treasure.



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