Accessories

First Look: Editor’s Choice—Amok Sunglasses by Tifosi

The Tifosi Amok sunglasses are lightweight, ventilated sunglasses that are great for trail runs and not wildly expensive.

Amok Sunglasses
Materials: Polycarbonate lens, plastic frame
Price: $80
Best Features: Durable, allows runner to see in just about any kind of bright light, comfortable, not overly expensive.
Room for Improvement: None

Trail runners frequently have to deal with changing light conditions. You can be in bright sunlight one moment, then dappled sunlight when you pass through a stand of trees. It can cloud over, rain or snow, and then the sun can some back out, all of which can make it hard to see at times. The Tifosi Amok helps with these changing conditions.

These sunglasses are made with a durable, flexible plastic frame that fits comfortably on your head in a wrap style. They include an adjustable nose piece so you can dial in to your own personal preference. The frame is also well ventilated. The lenses are made of scratch-resistant polycarbonate. The lenses are also polarized and changeable, with three different options, depending on light conditions. It’s easy and intuitive to switch the lenses.

I don’t normally run in sunglasses, but I really loved the Tifosi Amok. I found these sunglasses did not bounce around at all when I ran nor did they pinch the bridge of my nose or temples. I used them primarily with the smoke colored lenses, which block the most light (the all-conditions red and clear lenses can be used for less light). I could see perfectly with them, as they cut down the glare from both direct and reflected sunlight. No depth perception or definition was lost. As I’ve mostly worn them on cold days, surrounded by snow, I was expecting them to fog up pretty badly, but they didn’t at all. Overall, I loved these sunglasses and plan to use them quite a bit. At an affordable $79.95, they’re a great deal.

We were so impressed with the Amok, it’s earned TR’s Editor’s Choice. Well done! 

—Will Fisher, age 47, chooses training runs and races for their scenic value. He’s a relatively large runner who cross trains a lot and is excited to have just been accepted into the Western States 100 Endurance Run.